7.128 Play Ball

7.128

12 (Thu) May 2016

Jwipo

2.5

at Jamsil Baseball Stadium

-Jamsil, Seoul-

with DJ and friend

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At Korean baseball stadiums, the food is either brought in or purchased at fast food outlets within.
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Based on what places were selling — even Burger King emphasizing bird over burger — and what people around us were eating, the most popular item was clearly fried chicken, in various forms.
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Beer is also sold in 2-liter bottles at convenience stores, much cheaper, which explains why the relatively expensive draft beer stands were somewhat quiet.

Jwipo is a Korean dried fish product.  Traditionally made from the fish jwichi* (쥐치), dried  — “jwi + po (dried meat)” — ground up and mixed with fillers, loaded with additives and preservatives, pressed into a flat patty, shelf-life = forever — Korea’s original mass-produced, highly processed junk food.  Typically flash-roasted (e.g., over coals or open flame), often served with gochujang or mayo or both, though fine on its own, eaten as a snack, ideally with beer.  Once ubiquitous, now something of a nostalgic novelty, more likely to be sold by street vendors in tourist areas rather than at any mainstream establishment.

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As mentioned above, most people would rather eat fried chicken.
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In its uncooked glory.
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Griddle-pressed, which is unconventional…
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…but perhaps preferable for convenience, expediency, consistency, and cleanliness.
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Peanuts are a common accompaniment to dried fish.

Children’s Day Holiday + Annual Leave, Day 8 (see previously 7.127 Yangjangpi).

In Seoul.  Arrived last Monday.  On extended leave to take care of various administrative matters in preparation for the family’s move to the Philippines in a couple months.  Going back to Manila, by myself, this coming Monday.

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*According to various on-line sources, jwichi is supposedly the same species as the threadsail filefish (Stephanolepis cirrhifer), which I find a little hard to believe, because I’ve never seen a fish looking anything remotely like this at a Korean market.

Took DJ — who’s completely consumed by baseball these days, wanting someday to manage a team after retiring from professional play — to watch a game.  His first time at the stadium, my first time at a Korean stadium.  By good fortune, the Samsung Lions (based in Daegu) — his favorite team — were in town this week to play the LG Twins (based in Seoul).  Lions won 7 to 5.

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A very good idea.
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Whereas watching baseball in America is strictly about what’s happening on the field — except in LA, where dumbass/half-assed Dodger fans like to initiate The Wave at critical points of the game — Korean baseball culture is all about the fans in the stands : cheerleaders, DJ and live band, everyone constantly on their feet, clapping, chanting, singing, dancing; never a dull moment.
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Worth the price of admission.
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Thunder sticks!
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In a country with such a sophisticated waste disposal system — where even plastic bags at the grocery store are sold to be used as garbage bags — I’m shocked/ashamed to see that they haven’t figured out a way to reduce the trash resulting from all the packed food.

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